Latest News/Ongoing Projects
Who's time is it anyway?
August 1, 2015
Locked in the passenger seat, driving about the back roads of Samoa, I wrestle with controlling time. I have no control, of course.  I am not driving nor am I deciding. I am along for the ride, during which others choose how to spend the time we have together. Herein lies my greatest frustration with visiting the many places I go.  I am out of control.  I mean, if course, out of the place of taking control.  And for those who know me well, that is not the place I prefer to be.
Individual Matters
July 29, 2015
On Saturday last, the teens of Youth to Youth performed on a basketball court at the Rita end of Majuro.  I wandered about the gathered audience snapping pictures and watching as individual youth members both played and played with the audience.  In scene after scene, individual after individual rose to the challenge of sharpening and improving their performances.
Stay Out of the Improvised Way
July 23, 2015
In the first days of the program, the students listen with a kind of quizzical, blank look.  When they stand to answer a question or introduce themselves—wait, strike that—IF they stand and IF they answer and IF you can hear them, the words are laced with embarrassed giggles and quick looks about the room to see who might be laughing at them.  The words tumble out as fast and briefly as possible so the pained individual can sit back down as quickly as possible to wishfully disappear from sight. All of this belies the pos
Art and Behavior Psychology
July 18, 2015
I flung the incentive out to our trainees.  If we could all stay focused on the task of the day—rehearsing all of our songs and short performances—we could finish the day early.  For me, this was an unprecedented incentive.  In fact, I am not sure that I’ve ever ended a day early out here, mostly because there are always challenges of some sort that get in the way.  But it seemed worth the attempt.  Afternoons, the stifling hot afternoons of 35 people simultaneously rehearsing in a wooden box with a tin roof, sun hammering away at us, feel brutal.  Focus
I Have an Idiom
July 13, 2015
I sat at the back of the tin-roofed community room, a stiflingly hot building in which we were conducting our youth-oriented training.
A Tale that Perspires
July 7, 2015
I resisted writing a follow-up to my last blog.  It ended as the electricity in my apartment, and mine alone, went out.  It made for a brutal night of a stiflingly hot sleep.  I was, at times, slick with sweat.  A bed soaked by my perspiration.  I would lay still and snooze long enough to ‘dry out’ for a period, but upon waking to gulp some badly need water, my body’s waterworks would begin again.  The morning ‘shower’ was a trickle of water that took time to fill a small tub so I could bucket bath it.  The heat, however, did not allow me to dry.  I left
I am, most decidedly, back
July 5, 2015
As I walked to the waiting area for my morning flight, I glanced into the gate area where I first left for the Marshall Islands in 1990.  Several memories flickered through my imagination. The tall Marshallese gentleman must have read some nervousness in my demeanor which prompted him to ask me if it was my first trip to Majuro.  When I confirmed his guess, we got to chatting about my reason for the visit. He was very encouraging about my journey, which helped relax me as I faced one of my first international adventures.
The Laugh Factor (in perfect harmony)
August 11, 2014
Boom. The class erupts.  Boom. The class erupts again. Boom, the class reverberates as the sound bounces from individual to individual, the reverberations feeding off and into each other.  What ignites this massive sound is a very simple action.  Just a twist, turn or wiggle of the body.  As the class of teaching students and I dive into simple drama activities, whenever abrupt or wild movement is called for, the class booms in laughter.  
What the Teachers do to Me, or, Why work in Places no one Knows?
August 9, 2014
I am in the midst of day two of a course for classroom teachers in American Samoa through the University of Hawaii.  Day two for me, but the beginning of the third week for the teachers. Yes, you read that right, I completely missed the first two weeks because I committed myself to programs in other parts of the world at the same time.  However, that makes for a different story. In this tale, I focus on the brief and amazing journey of local teachers who, like me, become engaged in a new world that opens up all sorts of transformational experiences. 
Hear Now
July 24, 2014
On any given morning, a crowd of sounds permeates the school campus. AS the sky flickers into light, a competition between wind and birds proceeds. The wind blusters, hard, at times grabbing focus and obliterating all other sound of the moment. But it cannot sustain itself and as the wind retreats, assumably to gather its own breath, the varied twitterings, tweets, cries and calls of the multi-cultural population of birds, co-opts the airwaves. Small hums, sharp cries, a yelp or two, tiny tweets and rolled whistles bounce back and forth. The crows work hard to dominate.